CHILDREN

A child’s illness or injury can be challenging and confusing for everyone. Depending on your child’s age and developmental stage, you may notice different types of reactions. Fortunately there are ways you can enhance your child’s ability to cope, while helping them build resilience to thrive in the future.

A child’s illness or injury can be challenging and confusing for everyone. Depending on your child’s age and developmental stage, you may notice different types of reactions. Fortunately there are ways you can enhance your child’s ability to cope, while helping them build resilience to thrive in the future.

This resource is being offered to help you become more aware of the behaviors associated with PTSD, and how they may differ depending on the age of the child. You can also find coping techniques, tips for talking about their illness/injury, and other suggestions to support your child and family when confronted with this trying situation.

Select the age group below that best describes your child to learn more.

Young Children

Infants and young children rely on their parents and the adults around them to provide a sense of safety and security through trusted routines. Your young child may seem to “bounce back” to a calmer or happier state, even after upsetting or painful moments in treatment, when you are there to provide distraction, security, and comfort.

School Age Children

School-age children are developing a basic understanding of their body and how it works. They also are beginning to learn how medicines and treatments might help when a person gets sick or hurt. They have started to develop coping skills for upsetting situations, and probably have some ways to help themselves feel better or calm down when they are a little bit scared.

Teenagers

Teens are more able than younger children to see the bigger picture of the illness/injury. They can understand more complex ideas about illness and treatment, but still need an adult help to fill in gaps in what they know and understand.

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